Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival 2017

art for Arthur Lyons Film Noir Banner 2017

Founded in 2000 by the late mystery writer, Arthur Lyons, this unique film festival presents an eclectic program of landmark and obscure movies from the classic film noir era at the state of the art Camelot Theaters in Palm Springs, California.

Produced and hosted by Alan K. Rode, the festival is accentuated by post screening discussions with an array of guest stars, book signings and other special events.

All-Access passes and individual tickets will be available during the week of April 2nd at: http://arthurlyonsfilmnoir.ning.com

 

 

ONE WAY STREET

 

The 2017 UCLA Film and Television Archive Festival of Preservation

One of my favorite cinema events is the annual Festival of Preservation (FOP) produced by the UCLA Film & Television Archive and presented at the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.

From classics like Ernst Lubitsch’s Trouble in Paradise (1932), early animated Paramount shorts, silent films, documentaries including The Murder of Fred Hampton (1971) and a 1965 KTLA-TV Nancy Wilson concert, the Archive’s preservation activities encompasses the full spectrum of the moving image.

The Film Noir Foundation has funded (whole or in part) nine different films that have been restored by UCLA along with the striking of numerous preservation prints of other noir titles.

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The Season of Noir

The late spring and beginning of summer is my favorite time of the year in Southern California.  The roses are in bloom, the temperature in the San Fernando Valley hasn’t yet reached the upper extremes of a pizza oven and the birds sing all day.  It is also the time for cinematic darkness. The annual NOIR CITY, HOLLYWOOD film festival opens this Friday for its 18th season at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood.  It is difficult for me to believe that I’ve been attending this festival since a screaming Lawrence Tierney was 86ed from the theater lobby. I’ve also been the co-programmer and co-host with my inspired comrade in noir, Eddie Muller.  With the American Cinematheque’s stellar programmer Gwen DeGlise, we have put together some memorable programs during the past decade, but perhaps none better than this year’s fest that opens on Friday April 15.

In addition to opening the festival with the Film Noir Foundation and Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s (HFPA) funded restoration of LOS TALLOS AMARGOS (THE BITTER STEMS), 1956 by the UCLA Film and Television Archive, our good friends at Universal Studios have struck new 35mm prints of cinematic treasures including ALL MY SONS (1948), FLESH AND FURY (1951), FLESH AND FANTASY (1943)  and MEET DANNY WILSON (1952) that haven’t been viewed on a theater screen for decades and are not on DVD.  The extraordinary festival line-up can be found on the American Cinematheque website

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Back on the Street with THE BIG COMBO and PITFALL

To inaugurate my new and improved ONE WAY STREET blog and web site, I am posting my introduction to THE BIG COMBO and PITFALL double feature when I presented on Wednesday night at the Million Dollar Theatre in downtown L.A. While I was crossing the street at the corner of 3rd, I gazed across Broadway at the Bradbury building and realized that this was where Edmond O'Brien, wracked with pain from luminous poisoning, staggered to his rendezvous with destiny in D.O.A. This was also where Lon Chaney Jr., recently revived from the San Quentin gas chamber, murderously prowled for "Squeemy Ellis" in Indestructible Man and where Jack Lemmon parked his T-Bird filled with ladders, paint, and Romy Schneider to deface a billboard in Good Neighbor Sam. This was also the same real estate where Harrison Ford was assigned to hunt replicants in Blade Runner (1982). I was treading on cinematic hallowed ground. And when I arrived under the marquee of Sid Grauman's 1918 movie palace and was greeted by 83-year old actor Clu Gulager who actually walked from West Hollywood to attend this screening, I knew at that moment, there was no other place I would rather be.

Million Dollar Theatre

"It is always a distinct privilege to participate in an event involving the UCLA Film and Television Archive. The Archive's mutually beneficial partnership with The Film Noir Foundation has resulted in the complete restoration of The Prowler and Cry Danger along with the archiving of new 35 mm prints of such classic noir titles as High Wall, Loophole, Cry Tough, Down Three Dark Streets and more recently Three Strangers.

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The 10th Annual Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival

For those of you who are not Facebook habitues, I wanted to post a link about the upcoming Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival next week 13-16 May in Palm Springs at the Camelot Theatres. It is our tenth anniversary and with a line up of rare films and guest stars such as Ernest Borgnine, June Lockhart, Ann Robinson, Julie Garfield and Tommy Cook, this year's fest will be landmark event. Hope to see you there!

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Odds and Ends

While resolving that I will not be at the screenings of Red Light and Walk a Crooked Mile at Noir City in San Francisco this Thursday because work beckons, my thoughts turned to...

The Noir City opener this weekend in San Francisco

A better weekend of darkness could not be imagined! After the opening night double header of Pitfall-one of the seminal film noirs, IMHO and Larceny on Friday, Saturday brought the debut of the restored print of Cry Danger (funded by the Film Noir Foundation, btw) followed by another Bill Bowers scribed jewel, The Mob. The Cry Danger screening was special. Not only was this underrated film in spectacular shape thanks to the stellar efforts of the UCLA restoration team, I brought my pal, Richard Erdman up to the Castro Theater to share in the good vibes. Dick has the best part in the film as a smartass drunken sidekick to Dick Powell. He shared a dirty joke and several yarns about the film on stage with Eddie Muller after receiving a standing ovation from an appreciative 1200 people. Really a special evening. In between it was enjoying the wonderful cuisine and hospitality with close friends that makes San Francisco one of my all time favorite burgs. I am looking forward to returning to the Noir City this weekend to introduce screenings of Armored Car Robbery and Inside Job. Open up those Golden Gates!

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Robert Ryan Centennial Tribute at the Egyptian

Please join me at the Egyptian Thetre on Wednesday November 11th for a Centennial Birthday Tribute to the great Robert Ryan. The American Cinematheque will be screening two of Ryan's best films, The Set-Up (1949) and The Naked Spur (1952). I will introduce the screenings with Ryan's daughter, Lisa and the one and only... Marsha Hunt in attendance.

For information on ticket prices and other details on the screening, please open this link.

robert ryan

Still More Noir from Palm Springs

 



MSNBC's Kim Morgan on stage with the irrepressible Ann Rutherford following the screening of INSIDE JOB (1946). This rare programmer hadn't been shown to a theater audience since its release; it held up extremely well. Ann was terrific alongside Alan Curtis and Preston Foster. Even more delightful were Ann's endless stream of Old Hollywood anecdotes that left the patrons in stitches. From learning Yiddish from Preston Foster, to obtaining swimming lessons from Buster Crabbe at the Hollywood Athletic Club while "fibbing" her way into Westerns with Gene Autry, Ann had plenty of chutzpah to spare... and she still does! Her insider accounts of GONE WITH THE WIND were priceless and as she readily admitted, GWTW has "...turned my golden years to platinum".

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More from Palm Springs Noir

 

Here I am with the beautiful and charming Barbara Rush. Can you believe that she started in films back in 1950 and is 82 years old - I can't! At the opening night reception, Barbara related a hair-raising story during the filming of HOMBRE (1967) how she and others in the cast nearly plunged over a precipice in a stagecoach!

rush rode

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Opening Night at the Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival

Here are a couple of pics from last night's opener at the Camelot Theatre in Palm Springs.

Barbara Rush, star of BIGGER THAN LIFE was the opening night special guest along with the ageless Marsha Hunt, Sherry Jackson and others.

Here is a shot of Barbara and Marsha

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The Oscar Report

Now that I have staggered my way towards the end of an incredibly busy week, I can take a few deep breaths and briefly pontificate about the 2009 Academy Awards.

I thought Hugh Jackson did a superb job as the host; he was fetching, entertaining and charming.

The production numbers were well-staged and thoroughly enjoyable. Watching the boffo Beyonce-centric number (how long are her gorgeous gams, I wondered...) I thought a time warp took us back to THE HOLLYWOOD PALACE or the ED SULLIVAN SHOW.

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Mildred Pierce at the Million Dollar Theatre

After hosting the eighth annual Palm Springs Film Noir Festival, from May 29 - June 1, I made it back home in time for screenings of Mildred Pierce at the Million Dollar Theatre and The Damned Don't Cry - the latest entry of my continuing Femme Fatale Hall of Fame series at the Silent Movie Theatre. I'll be posting a detailed low down about the wildly successful Palm Springs noir fete - complete with photos - this coming week. For the present, I wanted to share some details about the Mildred Pierce event.

It was a distinct privilege to host a sold-out screening of Mildred Pierce (1945) at the restored Million Dollar Theatre at 307 South Broadway in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday June 4th. The screening was part of the Los Angeles Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series that is now in its 22nd year. For more about the LRS, the Million Dollar Theatre and the L.A. Conservancy, please check out this link:

http://www.laconservancy.org/remaining/index.php4

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Shack Out on 101 with Terry Moor

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“The apes have taken over — while we were busy watching television and filling our freezers, they’ve come out of the jungle and moved in!”

That line is definitely not the stereotypical 1950's movie denouement particularly when it is uttered by the stolidly full-upright Frank Lovejoy about Communism in Shack Out on 101 (1955) that screened last night at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica.

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The Latest from the L.A. Noirfest

The L.A. Film Noir Festival really gained traction this week with some superb screenings and great attendance for the hypercompetitive Tinseltown movie market.

Thursday's double bill at the Egyptian was Cry of the City (1948) and City of Fear (1959). The former picture is one of the classic Fox noirs that has yet to be issued in DVD format - an omission that noir aficionados find baffling.

Cry of the City

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Film Noir at the Eqyptian and Aero Theatres in L.A.

The 8th Annual Festival of Film Noir jumped off at the Egyptian Theatre last Thursday night. Although the American Cinematheque is the sponsor of this enterprise, there are some new wrinkles in the dark shading of this year's festival:

1. The Film Noir Foundation is the festival co-sponsor with the Cinematheque.

2. My colleague and friend, Eddie Muller, is performing the hosting duties along with yours truly who wrangled most of the screening guests this time around. Eddie and I programmed this festival along with Chris D. at the Cinematheque. Thematically, this year's fest is a series of noir double bills featuring L.A. vs. N.Y.

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DVDs